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Dragonair introduces less-advantaged youngsters to the world of aviation

2015년10월25일

(HONG KONG) Dragonair today welcomed a group of young people from the Child Development Fund (CDF) to the airline’s headquarters, where they took part in the “Journey of Dreams” aviation programme. The first part of the programme consisted of an interactive workshop called “Aviation 360”, which allowed the youngsters to take an up-close look at different aspects of the aviation operation. In mid-November, the youths – none of whom have ever flown before – will take to the sky with their families and mentors to enjoy their first experience in the air.

This year’s “Journey of Dreams” especially supports the Labour and Welfare Bureau’s CDF. The CDF seeks to encourage their participants who are aged 10-16 from a disadvantaged background to plan for their future, develop asset-building habit and accumulate savings and intangible assets to aid their future development.  Through Journey of Dreams, CDF participants were able to get a taste of the aviation world and acquire knowledge they otherwise would not have access to.

Speaking at the event, Dragonair Chief Executive Officer Algernon Yau said: “Dragonair has been rooted in Hong Kong for 30 years. We strive to provide excellent services to passengers, and we are constantly on the lookout for opportunities to give back to our community. We have been proactive in providing youths with different aviation exposures, inspiring and nurturing talents; which in turn, will also contribute to the development of the industry. We are delighted to support the Labour and Welfare Bureau Child Development Fund, which shares a similar vision with us in youth development and education. The programme today will help students get a multi-dimensional glimpse into the aviation industry. We hope that they can apply the knowledge they learn today to aid their future planning and realising their dreams.”

Deputy Secretary for Labour and Welfare Doris Cheung said: "I hope today's precious experience would help CDF participants understand more about the aviation industry, thereby exploring their interests in the industry.  I am also looking forward to collaborating with more caring companies like Dragonair in offering different experiences to CDF participants for enhancing their knowledge and broadening their horizons."

Today’s workshop was led by aviation professionals such as Dragonair pilots, Cabin Crew, ground staff and engineers. Through talks, interactive activities and demonstrations, they gave participants insights into different aspects of the airline operation.

Through simple experiments such as blowing onto a piece of paper and with pilots paring down complicated concerts into bite-size pieces, participants grasped the importance of air pressure in aerodynamics and the functions of different parts of an aircraft such as the stabiliser, flap and elevator. Through an interactive exercise in the mock-up cabin, the participants also learnt about the role of the staff on the ground, during boarding and the service inflight.

A flying experience would be incomplete without aircraft engineering. Dragonair’s engineers professed in detail how parts work to keep the plane airborne. For example, they talked about how the pitot tube worked to measure the airspeed. To prep participants for their very first flight, Dragonair ground staff also explained the process step-by-step from check-in to boarding. A role play was conducted to give participants a taste of the working duties of an airport staff.

Participant Lee Wing Man thoroughly enjoyed the programme, she said: “I have never flown before and much of my aviation knowledge comes from TV dramas. To be able to talk to real pilot and cabin crew and learn from different speakers has deepened my understanding about the aviation industry. I am going to share with my family and mentor about what I’ve learnt today. We are all very excited about being able to fly together the first time!”